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Practical Information

Helpful doctors and other health practitioners

At the very least, people with M.E. look for a practitioner who:

  • takes M.E./CFS seriously
  • is open to learn more about approaches to regaining health
  • works with the patient in a two-way communication
  • is not dismissive, but is patient over the long haul
  • does not forget to periodically review and retest
Some practitioners have developed a particular expertise or approach in working with patients with M.E./CFS. We have a list of doctors who have been recommended for various reasons who might be good to help deal with ME./CFS. To access this information you need to be a member of the group which involves only a very small fee and allows you to be involved as much or as little as you want, while accessing great information and resources.
Sharing your experiences, good or bad, could be a very helpful contribution to the quality of advice we are able to give. We also receive queries about dentists. We would love to hear of dentists with expertise in removing mercury amalgams.

Pancrex

Pancrex is not a drug, but pancreatic enzymes in tablet or capsule form. It is known to improve the condition of ME/CFS patients, and can be prescribed by your Doctor. Pancrex contains digestive enzymes normally released by the pancreas. They assist in the digestion of starch, fat and proteins. Supplements are given for pancreatic disorders.

Bio Paints

These paints are claimed to be low allergy products, and so may be useful for M.E.
sufferers with chemical sensitivities. Check out their website Bio Paints.

Subsidised taxi vouchers

People with ongoing health problems that make public transport difficult, may apply for an allocation of the 50% discount taxi vouchers. There is an initial cost of $30 to cover ID photos and administration. Thereafter, annual membership is $15 only. Phone our Community Worker for more details 03-365-5887.

Christchurch City Council Warmer Homes Policy

The programme is for Community Service Card holding home owners, with open fires or coal burners in the main living area. Finance is available to disable the fire, install insulation, and put in alternative heating. More details are available from our Community Worker 03-365-5887, or by calling (03) 352 4488 direct.

Low interest loans from the Paraplegic & Physically Disabled Foundation

People with ME/CFS could be eligible for these special, very low interest loans, which are available to disabled people who would be turned down by any hard-nosed lending institution. They are mainly provided for housing, buying vehicles, or setting oneself up in business. Miscellaneous items considered to be in the best interest of the applicant are also considered. For further information, contact our Community Worker 03-365-5887, or phone the Foundation at (03) 379 5939.

Housework and gardening assistance

This may be available through WINZ for those too unwell to cope.

A note about designated doctors

Those on invalid benefit and community wage (for sickness) are asked periodically to see a doctor designated by WINZ to confirm eligibility for benefits. We have details of doctors who are particularly understanding of M.E.

Mobility parking permits

New members may not have realised that their disability may make them eligible for mobility parking permits. A permit for 5 years of parking privileges costs $35. Application forms from NZCCS, ph.348-8974.

Christchurch libraries special membership

Those who have a condition that restricts use of the library may apply for special membership. Special Members may:

  • Borrow books, magazines, talking books, videos, tapes and CDs free of charge (some exceptions);
  • Borrow items for up to 6 weeks;
  • Reserve items free of charge;
  • Return items late without being charged.
Eligibility is residence in Christchurch and a letter of verification from a specialist (or doctor).

Avoid iodised salt

The Thyroid Foundation does not recommend the use of iodized salt for thyroid patients. Iodized salt contains aluminium and sugar as stabilizing elements, and those are irritants to the thyroid and can create imbalances. The Foundation suggests a switch to unrefined salt, such as Celtic salt, Japanese salt, or good quality sea salt.

Food Additives

Crown Public Health has a free pocket booklet on identifying food additives. Additives have international code numbers, and usually only the numbers appear on food labels. Ph.03-364-7844 for a copy.